Quick Answer: What’S Another Way To Say You’Re Welcome?

Should I say you’re welcome in an email?

As a general rule, you should never reply-all when sending a “you’re welcome” mail.

Only reply to the person or people that the thank you came from.

Do keep in mind that etiquette rules never require that you acknowledge a thank-you mail, even it’s very elaborate..

How does De nada mean you’re welcome?

“De nada” means (literally) that there’s nothing to be thankful about. “No hay nada que agradecer”. It’s semantically similar to “not at all”, but it can also be correctly translated to “You’re welcome”.

What is correct your welcome or you are welcome?

YOUR is a possessive pronoun. There is nothing possessive in YOUR welcome so you can’t use it in this instance. The correct answer is YOU’RE. YOU’RE is a contraction for YOU ARE and the technical phrase is YOU ARE WELCOME.

What is the response to Merci?

de rienThe usual answer to “merci” in French is “de rien” which has about the same meaning as “no problem” and translates to “it’s nothing”. The most commonly used is probably “De rien”.

Can I say you are most welcome?

Both are correct, with contextual differences. You’re most welcome would generally be used in response to an expression of thanks. I thank you so much for that lovely dinner. You’re most welcome.

What is another way to say you’re welcome?

10 Ways to Say “You’re Welcome”You got it.Don’t mention it.No worries.Not a problem.My pleasure.It was nothing.I’m happy to help.Not at all.More items…•May 21, 2014

Is it polite to say you’re welcome?

She explained that “you’re welcome”—a phrase that is meant to be courteous—is sometimes perceived as insincere or snarky. … When the phrase is exclaimed in the absence of thanks, as comedians have made popular, it is obviously rude. When used graciously, “you’re welcome” is a perfectly polite form of expression.

What is reply for thank you?

You’re welcome. No problem. No worries. Don’t mention it.

Why do you say you’re welcome?

Why is it that “you’re welcome,” a phrase that is meant to be gracious, is often tinged with gloat? It wasn’t always so double-edged. The saying stems from the Old English “wilcuma,” which wedded the words “pleasure” and “guest” to allow hosts to express their openness to visitors.